UMMA EXPLORER

Difficulty: ????
Part of the SummerGame2014 Game

The University of Michigan Museum of Art (UMMA) has over 19,000 works of art representing over 150 years of art collecting. We’ll stop by a couple notable pieces and discover a few just off the beaten path. A map of the museum can be downloaded here and is available at both entrances to the museum.

Your journey begins at the ground-level “Maxine and Stuart Frankel and Frankel Family Wing” entrance off State Street. Your first code is the name of the swinging sculpture just outside the doors.

Once inside, turn right and head up the stairs leading into the old Alumni Memorial Hall (elevator is just to the left of the stairs). Head down the hall, and look to your far right as you enter the Hall. To the right of the doors, you’ll find our 16th president reading by firelight in a painting that captures those noble qualities we’ve come to associated with him — his humble background, his determination to make something of himself, his solitariness. Your second code is the word in the last sentence that completes this phrase: “...the savior of the union who was also a common man — ________, accessible, and responsive to people without influence.”

Now turn to your left and head across the hall into the “Marvin H. and Mary M. Davidson Gallery” of European Art (1650-1830). Your third code is the name of the U.S. city that appears on a mid-18th century Engraved Powder Horn.

Exiting the European Room, turn right, pausing for a moment to admire the famous "Death of General Wolfe," and head up the staircase (elevator is next to the stairs). At the top of the stairs, turn right again and head to the back of the U-shaped apse. Your fourth code is in the text that accompanies James McNeil Whistler’s painting of a rainy shoreline. The ghostly figure in the painting - very different from this artist’s more famous portrait of his mother — can be summed up in a word from the text that both describes the painting and completes this phrase, “...but such ___________ minimalism in Whistler’s paintings stood at odds with the highly finished Academic painting of the period.”

Keep walking around the “U” and turn right into the hall leading to the second story section of the new Frankel Family Wing. Stroll into the A. Alfred Taubman Gallery (Design Gallery on the map) and past the famous DSR Chair by designers Charles and Ray Eames. I know you’d like to sit down and take a breather — but the security guards will be after you, so don’t! Keep going through the African Art and down the steps (elevator straight ahead) into the Photography Gallery. Look for the first photograph on the long wall. Your fifth code is the second word in the title of Philippe Halsman’s print of artist Salvador Dali.

You sixth code is the name of an 11th-century work — based on a deity with the head of an animal, which you will find right near the entry (closest to the Dali portrait) to the South, Southeast Asian Art Gallery.

Your final two codes are up on the third level (marked “M” for Mezzanine Level in the Visitor Guide) in the Modern & Contemporary Art area. To get there, head down that long hall in the Photography Gallery to the elevator at the other end and take the elevator up to “M” (Mezzanine.) After exiting the elevator, turn right and head into the "Joan and Bob Tisch Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art." Look for a painting of Two Girls Reading by the great Pablo Picasso. Your seventh code is the word that completes the phrase at the beginning of the text, “...with strident colors and ________ forms.”

Finally, it’s time to end your exploration of UMMA in style by lounging in a hammock with a good book. Four paintings down from those two girls is a painting of someone doing just that, by Milton Avery. Your eighth - and final! - code is the very last word in the description of this painting.

180 SummerGame2014 point bonus when earned

This badge has been awarded to 238 players

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